fasten


fasten
fasten, fix, attach, affix mean to make something stay firmly in place or in an assigned place. All but fix (and that sometimes) imply a uniting or joining of one thing to another or of two things together.
Fasten implies an attempt to keep a thing from moving by uniting it (as by tying, binding, nailing, or cementing) to something else or by restraining it by means of some mechanical device (as a lock, a screw, or a hook and eye)
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fasten a horse to a post

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fasten down the lid of a box

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fasten a calendar to a wall

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fasten a door

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fasten a dress in the back

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Fix implies an attempt to keep something from falling down or from losing hold; it suggests such operations as driving in or implanting deeply, usually with care and accuracy
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fix a stake in the ground

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unless their roots are deeply fixed, plants will not be strong

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It is more common in its extended than in its basic sense, but the implications remain the same
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fix a face in one's memory

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fix facts in one's mind

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fix a color in a fabric by use of a mordant

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In some phrases where fasten and fix are used interchangeably there may be a distinction in meaning which is subtle but justified; thus, to fix one's affections on someone connotes concentration and fidelity while to fasten one's affections on someone may, and often does, suggest covetousness or an attempt to hold or control; to fix the blame upon a person implies solid grounds for the accusation, but to fasten the blame upon someone often suggests factitious grounds or selfish motives
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his heart is fixed, trusting in the Lord— Ps 112:7

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society wanted to do what it pleased; all disliked the laws which Church and State were trying to fasten on them— Henry Adams

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Attach stresses connection or union in order to keep things together or to prevent their separation; it usually implies a bond, link, or tie
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the lid is attached to the box by hinges

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attach loose sheets by means of a staple

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the collarbone is attached to the shoulder blade at one end and to the breastbone at the other

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he attached himself to the cause in his youth

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in some countries little odium is attached to drunkenness

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attach a condition to a promise

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she undertakes to attach him to her by strong ties: a child, or marriage— Parshley

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Affix usually implies imposition of one thing upon another; it may convey no further information
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affix a seal to a document

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Felton affixed this bull to the gates of the bishop of London's palace— Hallam

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but it more often than not suggests either attachment by an adhesive (as paste, gum, or mucilage)
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affix a stamp to an envelope

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or subscription (as of a name to a document)
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he's old enough to affix his signature to an instrument— Meredith

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Analogous words: *secure, rivet, moor, anchor: *join, connect, link, unite: adhere, cleave, cling, *stick, cohere: bind, *tie
Antonyms: unfasten: loosen, loose
Contrasted words: *separate, part, sever, sunder, divorce, divide

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fasten — fasten …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Fasten — ist die willentliche, völlige oder teilweise Enthaltung von Speisen, Getränken und Genussmitteln. Unter striktem Fasten versteht man den völligen Verzicht auf Speisen und Getränke über einen bestimmten Zeitraum hinweg, üblicherweise für einen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • fastēn — *fastēn, *fastæ̅n germ., schwach. Verb: nhd. festhalten, fasten; ne. hold, fast (Verb); Rekontruktionsbasis: got., ae., afries., anfrk., as., ahd.; Etymologie: Lüs.?, Lbd.? …   Germanisches Wörterbuch

  • fasten — Vsw std. (9. Jh.), mhd. vasten, ahd. fastēn Stammwort. Aus g. * fast ǣ Vsw. fasten , auch in gt. fastan, anord. fasta, ae. fæstan. Vorchristliche Wörter für fasten in den alten Sprachen bezeichnen entweder einfach das Nicht Essen (gr. nẽstis… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • Fasten — Fas ten, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Fastened}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fastening}.] [AS. f[ae]stnian; akin to OHG. festin[=o]n. See {Fast}, a.] 1. To fix firmly; to make fast; to secure, as by a knot, lock, bolt, etc.; as, to fasten a chain to the feet; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fasten — Fasten, verb. reg. neutr. welches das Hülfswort haben erfordert, sich aller Speise enthalten. Ich habe den ganzen Tag gefastet. Lange fasten ist kein Brot sparen. Ein Fasten anordnen. In engerer, und besonders der in der Römischen und… …   Grammatisch-kritisches Wörterbuch der Hochdeutschen Mundart

  • Fasten — Fasten, 1) die gänzliche Enthaltung vom Genuß von Nahrungsmitteln, ist in leichten Unpäßlichkeiten, bes. solchen mit Störung der Verdauung, oft ein Hauptmittel, um diese zu beseitigen. Ein längeres F. verträgt der Körper nicht, sondern geräth… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • fasten up — ˌfasten ˈup [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they fasten up he/she/it fastens up present participle fastening up past tense …   Useful english dictionary

  • Fasten — Fasten. Da die Enthaltung von kräftigen Nahrungsmitteln, besonders Fleischspeisen, ein Förderungsmittel für geistige Thätigkeit ist, und sonach wesentlich zur Erhebung des Gemüthes beiträgt, so trafen weise Gesetzgeber die Verordnung der Fasten,… …   Damen Conversations Lexikon

  • Fasten — Fasten, das, lat. jejunium, frz. jeûne, engl. fasting, Beschränkung sinnlicher Genüsse besonders der Nahrungsmittel od. Verzichtleistung auf dieselben. F. ist in krankhaften Zuständen, namentlich in Verdauungskrankheiten, häufig das einfachste… …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon


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